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Maven Books

Reviews about historical, literary, classic, and other fiction.  Miscellaneous book things.

Currently reading

Who Cooked Adam Smith's Dinner?: A Story of Women and Economics
Katrine Marcal
Delusions of Gender: How Our Minds, Society, and Neurosexism Create Difference
Cordelia Fine
Tales from the Underworld
Hans Fallada

Can Book Awards Poison Reader Reviews?

"Two business researchers, Balázs Kovács and Amanda J. Sharkey, at the Universities of Lugano and Chicago, respectively, analyzed thousands of reader reviews on Goodreads of 64 English-language books that either won or were short-listed for top book awards—including the National Book Award, the Man Booker Prize, and the PEN/Faulkner Award—between 2007 and 2011. To their surprise, while sales of the books that won awards skyrocketed following recognition, the online ratings of these same books plummeted."

 

The article goes on to explain that this may be due to having a wider audience -- people with more varied tastes in books -- reading a book, simply due to the award it received, rather than due to it fitting their own interests.

 

That seems to make sense, and I've definitely experienced this myself.  I've read books based on an award they won, rather than just being interested in them, and I rarely ended up actually enjoying them.  Though I think I have often attributed it more to judges awarding books for being edgy or show, rather than actually good. ;)

 

I'm a little skeptical of the researchers only having looked at Goodreads, since I've seen variations between reviews there and on other book community or bookselling sites.  They did mention that Goodreads users are fairly representative of fiction readers in general, but the researchers also weeded out the ratings without a comment, and extrapolated other data that wasn't explicit, so that can skew things even more.  So take that for what it is.